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20121031
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Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)
year with irene. we thought it was going to be such a big event for new york and it was a dud. it wasn't a big dud for vermont, new hampshire, new jersey, because of the flooding. but this is what we have to work through right now. this storm that looks like that, like just literally nothing, still a small category 1 hurricane, but can this morph literally into something that will have 80 to 90 mile per hour winds, put 20 inches of rain down, and cause millions of people to be without power for days and probably some for weeks. can it happen? yes. all the forecasts say that it will happen. but you know what, all the forecasts said that irene would be a worse storm than it was and it's not. everyone i'm talking to believes that this storm will be significantly more impact for new york, new jersey, maybe pennsylvania than irene was. >> it's going to be a tropical storm, right, by the time it gets up, by the time it actually hits the eastern seaboard? >> no, it will be a tropical storm briefly in here. here's the model guidance for you. the models are all right there. we put them into mot
here. also when you think back to what happened with irene, there was concern about flooding on the sound side here of the outer banks, so, you know, this area is prone to flooding. that's something that everyone's keeping a close eye on. also the winds out here are picking up. they've been right around ten to 25 miles per hour off and on. the rain off and on. but the situation out here will deteriorate as the day goes on. this area remains under a flash flood watch and a tropical storm warning. so people are taking stock of that. they're getting supplies. a lot of peel pl-- people planng to ride this storm out. we talked about some of the people who hadn't boarded up their windows. it turns out there's a mix of people there. are some people who have homes here who don't live here, so those homes have not been boarded up. some people who plan to ride the storm up. that's what we're seeing here. some who have left the area. because when you think back to what happened with irene, irene was more of a direct hit. people saw a lot of damage in this area. this time they're expecti
.6 foot rise. that's going to bring the water because i remember i was here with irene, it was up to the top of these benches. now you're talking about water that's going to be about this high. so i think it's without question that we're going to flood the battery here. how much of this water gets in the subway system, i don't know. >> what about the wind? >> a lot of reports suggest -- what was that? >> are we going to see something like you see in kansas where you see roofs blown over after acres and acres of property. are we going to see that kind of wind damage in the northeast this time? >> reporter: don't think of what i'm getting here is representative of the wind because it's really not. i'm protected from the buildings. but we have gusts already out at montauk at 71. this is not like where you're going to have 130-mile-per-hour winds, so, no, the answer to that question is no, but there will be so much tree damage we think across interior pennsylvania and new york and new jersey, even parts of new england, back down through west virginia that that's a big concern. i mean,
in new york city, lower manhattan in the battery, right where i was for irene, major power problems, flooding and surge, damage and power losses narragansett, buzzard's bay, but regardless, both scenarios here mean major disruptions for transportation, and commerce, major losses of power, power damage, and brian, really both of the scenarios paint a multi-million or even billion disaster, we have to keep a close eye on this as it will affect, as you mentioned, millions of people. >> jim, there don't seem to be good options here, we'll watch the weather as we just begin the coverage of the storm as it makes its way up the east coast. >>> now as we mentioned, the furious campaigning for the office, just 12 days to go, new polling, the marist poll in colorado, showing a dead heat with romney and obama at 48, and nevada, obama has a slight lead, over romney, 50-47 right now then the state of ohio, peter alexander traveling with the romney campaign in defiance, ohio, good evening peter. >> reporter: brian, good evening to you, these days the "o" in ohio could be optimism, this is the mos
. the mayor here wants to make sure people don't get complacent, basis year ago, hurricane irene, they had all these dire warnings, and it really didn't do much to this city. he wants to make sure they understand that this time there really could be some severe flooding, a storm surge of 4-eight of 8 feet which would mean where i'm standing will certainly be underwater. he's warning people in the low-lying parts of the island to prepare to evacuate. he said power could be out for days. they need a disaster supply kit. it's very important that people don't get complacent based on what happened a year ago because this one could be much worse. bob. >> schieffer: all right, thank you, my friend. chip reid in maryland. let's go now to cbs news correspondent elaine quijano. she is at point pleasant beach, new jersey this morning. elaine, what's the latest there? >> reporter: good morning to you, bob. well, governor chris christie has declared a statement of emergency here in new jersey, and he's also ordered the mandatory evacuation for residents who live on the barrier islands. that begin at 4:00 t
on the east coast. concerns it could hammer areas hit hard by hurricane irene. that was in august of 2011. crews are now getting ready for that. have a listen. >> just taking precautions. 75 yards off the river. full moon tide, hurricane, a lot of wind. it is going to come. just a matter how much. >> you get cinder blocks. we put stuff upstairs. like big stuff like tvs couches tables. stuff in the kitchen we move in case the water gets super high. >> try to be as prepared as you can. there are only some things you can do. we hope and pray the storm goes east. bill: those folks are in florida. janice dean in the fox news extreme weather center where she will stay until tuesday or wednesday of next week. >> or thursday. bill: what do you see right now, jd? >> as you mentioned we've got a lot of things coming together. we have kind of an atmospheric traffic jam that will allow this storm system to move northward and back up into the coast. this is the arctic cold front that will kind of break down as it moves eastward. that will allow this system to move westward. so right now, a hurricane 8
. irene was lots of water. we had extensive flooding. we don't expect anything near than that. this is serious storm. it will on us for a long time, three days or so with gale force or better winds. >> reporter: that was an emergency official we spoke with earlier. one issue i wanted to bring to your attention. water is coming up. beach is coming close to the sand dunes and ten miles there was a $37 million beach restoration program. a lost those homes are protected because of that new beach restoration which did hold up with hurricane irene. they have a lot of faith to keep their homes safe. people in those low-lying areas can expect extreme flooding. there were no mandatory evacuations in this area. so people who did leave left on their own accord. >> jamie: always good to take the safe route. elizabeth, i know you will be riding out the storm. keep us posted. thank you. >> gregg: brand-new report out shows the economy is growing, but, you know what, if you dig deeper, it's not good news at all. why some experts are saying there is a lot more behind those numbers. >> jamie:
to last year's hurricane? >> the issue that the damage is more extensive than it was for irene. power. be a long time to at this point, i don't think it is a good estmaste. >> brian: your original estimate 7-10 days? >> that's right. that was too optmistic. >> steve: and any advice for people with a generator and watching this and wires down in the neighborhood? >> we'll be out patrolling and the public officials urge don't go outside and don't go near electric wires or downed wires. you don't know if it is a phone or cable wire you don't know if it is wrapped up in our wires down the line. >> brian: when something like this happens, is it worth calling to report or should we assume that everyone is down and we will get to you when we can. >> customers should report an out age and if it goes off report it afterwards. >> gretchen: a lot of people can do that on line as well. if they have computer service. >> brian: i another question for you . in terms of water receding, the worst is over and water is getting out of there, is that what you are seeing? >> brian: that's what we are see w
had during hurricane irene about flooding in lower manhattan and damage on long island jersey shore come in to play. farther north talking about new england. in any case effects over the entire northeast part of the u.s. this is going to be just a high-profile, high-threat event, it looks like that we're talking about well into next week. and we really need to be paying close attention, because this is unprecedented, as best we can tell. >> bryan norcross, not such good news. very worrying. thanks for your expertise. >>> democrats seizing the opportunity to try to link mitt romney to richard mourdock's comments about rape and abortion in the indiana race. republicans insist what women care about most is the economy. >> what he said was crazy, but having said that, this election for president is not about that. >> joining me now is washington senator, washington senator patty murray, who of course chairs the democratic senatorial campaign committee. your job in this election is to make sure that democrats get re-elected and you don't lose control of the senate. richard mourdock could
, irene didn't do too much to new york city. but it certainly did a lot to vermont. and will this storm do something similar as it's stalling. here all the models bringing it up from the city down to about washington, d.c. but the big thing is it stops, it stops moving for 48 hours and it could rain for two days and make flooding. if it rains a half an inch an hour for 48 hours, that's two feet of rain in any one spot. that is going to cause significant flash flooding and the potential for big loss of life. >> chad, thanks for the update. we may well come back to you before the end of the show. appreciate it. >>> let's get back to politics and the subject of race. outspoken conservative ann coulter has a lot to say about just about everything, in fact. the new subject of her new book is "mugged, racial demagoguery" dedicated to quote, the freest black man in america. we'll discover who that is. ann coulter, welcome back. >> thank you. good to be here. >> i know you have been struggling with a bit of a cold. >> you have an unfair advantage about it tonight. >> you have been whining about it
shore. >> reporter: well, the fear is it's obviously going to be worse than irene because this storm is tracking to our south. it's going to go inland south of here. so that's going to pile the water up from now, from yesterday through today into tonight. and until the storm goes by us and gets past us on our longitude, then the winds will come back around. and that will be an offshore component of the wind. but that's not going to happen until sometime tomorrow. so in the meantime, the tide right now is trying to go out. it's not having much luck because the wind is blowing in from the northeast at 30 to 35 miles an hour. we're getting some gusts 45 miles an hour. but the worst of the storm is a long way away. we're still more than 40 # 0 miles away. when it comes in, as it gets closer, we'll have gusts as high as hurricane force. once those winds kick up over 60, you'll see the power outages ramping up exponentially. again, the high tide tonight, 8:00 to 8:30 up and down the shore. and that could be coincidental with the landfall, plus we have the full moon, the astronomical effect
know, new yorkers take everything in stride. a lot of people road out irene last year. a lot of those people we talked to today say they're not doing this time around. they get a sense that this is a little bit more serious. also to give you an idea, the new york stock exchange is staying open, be u the physical trading floor in lower manhattan will shut down. also, craig, broadway shows are going dark tomorrow. >> that's when you know it's a big deal in the big apple. michelle franzen, thank you so much for that. let's go to tom costello now, the approaching storm already disrupting air travel on the east coast. tom is at reagan national airport. how many cancellations, how many delays can we expect at this point, sir? >> reporter: we're looking at about 5,500 as of right now. we've got really the winds picking up dramatically in d.c. in the last hour and the temperature has developed. we have about 1,400 flights canceled today, tomorrow about 4,500 flights canceled. that's the big players on the east coast, united, delta, us airways, jetblue, all canceling flights as early as tomorr
hurricanes will hit the northeast part of the united states. arguably, irene and sandy were not major hurricanes on the salve fir simpson scale. but if you look back at the 1950s a similar type of weather patterns produced tin major hurricanes up the eastern seaboard in a seven-year period including one, donna, gave hurricane-force winds everywhere from florida to maine. there is nothing new under the sun. you're seeing recycling what happened before except a lot of people don't know what happened before. a lot of that people say where is this coming from? basically go back and take a look at the maps. you will see where it came from. jenna: we forget quickly. tough to forget images we're seeing out of this storm. joe, nice to have you with us today. we appreciate the context very much. >> my pleasure. thank you for having me. jon: prayers for the victims it appeared survivors of superstorm sandy. pope benedict offering his condolences from the vatican expressing solidarity with all of the recovery crews. plus a new call for president obama to answer key questions about the deadly ter
are open as of now. expectations are almost 12 foot storm surge. irene at 9 in comparison just to give you an idea of what we're looking at here. we're also starting to see some twitter pictures come in of the main fishing pier in ocean city, maryland being washed away. pictures of atlantic city underwater. it is a little tricky for us to put emphasis on campaign developments knowing what's to come weatherwise and that obviously is of the utmost concern especially in people safety but we do only have eight days left. that means weighing the impact on everything from early voting of course now to access and power to the polling places on election day itself. it is harder to get out the vote door knocking when people can't get out and about. the millions of dollars that conservatives have saved up to bombard the airways in the homestretch may be waste if the no one can watch tv. and even the news itself is going to be all storm all the time at least until the worst seemed to have past. it will change the nature of th
million more than we had in irene. >> wow. >> so it is -- it is a completely devastating storm from that perspective. and i think what we're going to find, unfortunately, when we get to the jersey shore today is just total devastation. >> yeah. >> and that's the real concern. because not only is it people's homes and private property, but also you have the tourism industry in new jersey which is one of our biggest industries. we're going to have to work hard to make sure we're ready for next summer at the jersey shore. >> governor chris christie, our prayers are with the state of new jersey this morning. thank you very much. >> thank you, governor, good luck. >> mika, joe, mike, willie, thank you all you guys, appreciate it. >>> coming up in minutes, author of the best-selling book "the perfect storm" and "war," we'll be right back. ♪ ♪ [ multiple sounds making melodic tune ] ♪ [ male announcer ] at northrop grumman, every innovation, every solution, comes together for a single purpose -- to make the world a safer place. that's the value of performance. northrop grumman. on ga
, under the name of irene dunne. at my age i have some from time to time started thinking about the end of things and it has occurred to me when my time does come i hope to go the way my dear old grand father did, quietly in his sleep, not screaming like the passengers in his car. [laughter] andrew made me laugh more than anybody i have ever met. we all loved andrew and andrew loved us. my wife, ali mills, was, loved so much by andrew and he said, i never dreamed that i would be in the same family with the mother from ""the wonder years"". he was so full of heart. the think i love most about andrew in terms his public persona how people on the left hated him until they met him and they started loving him. the "new yorker", sent a woman out to l.a. where we all live to do a piece on him. they did a long piece. she spent 10 days. brought the woman over to our house to meet us. i thought they would do a hatchet job. they did a love letter. she loved him. she couldn't say bad things about him. "new york times" wrote two major pieces about him in the last year of his life and they were both
Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)